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Rails Tutorial print edition and a reward for railstutorial.org reviews

Aug 21, 2015 • posted by Michael Hartl

Summary: The Ruby on Rails Tutorial print edition is out. Please leave a review at Amazon, and get a bonus reward for leaving a review at railstutorial.org. Update: The bonus offer has expired, but of course I still appreciate new reviews!

Greetings, all! I’ve got a bunch of exciting Rails Tutorial–related announcements planned for the coming months, but first I’ve got one that’s long overdue: the Ruby on Rails Tutorial print edition is out, and currently available at Amazon.com. It’s actually been out for a while, but the first print run at Amazon sold out fast, and I didn’t want to send an announcement until they’d restocked the supplies. That bottleneck has now been cleared, so anyone who wants a print version of the book should head to Amazon and pick up a copy. (The content is essentially the same as the version available via railstutorial.org, but a lot of people like owning a physical copy as well.)

To help keep up sales momentum, I hope you’ll take the time to leave a couple of reviews. The steps are simple:

  1. Leave a review at railstutorial.org. (This requires a Softcover account, which has your email address, which in turn is how I’ll know where to send the free command-line tutorial. If you bought the 3rd edition from railstutorial.org, you already have a Softcover account; otherwise, you will probably have to make one.)
  2. Leave a review at Amazon (no purchase necessary; can be based on electronic version from railstutorial.org)

I have a special reward for those who complete Step 1, which is a free copy of Learn Enough Command Line to Be Dangerous, an upcoming tutorial on the Unix command line. (I’d appreciate it if you completed Step 2 as well, but leaving an Amazon review is not necessary to get the reward.) There is no need to take further action once you leave a review at railstutorial.org; as long as your email address there is correct, you will automatically receive a copy of the command-line product when it’s ready. Thanks!

Cheers,

Michael

P.S. Rails 5 is slated to come out in the fall or winter (though no one knows exactly when). To answer the inevitable question: yes, I’m planning to update the Rails Tutorial accordingly. (Because the Rails Tutorial is designed to teach web development generally rather than Rails specifically, any changes will be aimed at compatibility rather than at covering new features.) Whether the upgrade is free or a paid supplement depends on how extensive the changes are; I’m cautiously optimistic I’ll be able to get away with minor updates, but there’s no way to know until Rails 5 actually ships. I’ll plan to send out an announcement with more details when the time comes.

P.P.S. Get the Ruby on Rails Tutorial print edition and/or leave a review to get a free copy of Learn Enough Command Line to Be Dangerous!

Michael-hartl
Michael Hartl

I’m Michael Hartl—author, educator, and entrepreneur. I’m probably best known as the creator of the Ruby on Rails Tutorial, a book and screencast series that together constitute one of the leading introductions to web development. Once called his “favorite book” by Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales, the Ruby on Rails Tutorial currently has over 150 5-star reviews at Amazon. I’m also (in)famous for creating Tau Day and The Tau Manifesto, which have inspired an international movement dedicated to the proposition that “pi is wrong.” (For example, as a result of The Tau Manifesto, MIT releases their admissions decisions each year at “Tau Time” (6:28 p.m.), and typing tau/2 at Google yields 3.14159…) Finally, I’m a founder of Softcover, a publishing system and sales platform for technical authors, which among other things powers both The Tau Manifesto and the Ruby on Rails Tutorial.

I’m a graduate of Harvard College and have a Ph.D. in Physics from Caltech, where I studied black hole dynamics and was an award-winning instructor in theoretical and computational physics. I’m also an alumnus of Y Combinator, the entrepreneur program that has produced companies such as Dropbox and Airbnb. (Alas, my own Y Combinator startup was neither Dropbox nor Airbnb.)